CANCER

Can the early symptoms of cervical cancer be prevented?

Spread the love

Actually it is rather difficult to know and recognize the early symptoms of cervical cancer, because usually in the symptoms of early stage cervical cancer, this disease does not cause any signs. Therefore, it is recommended that you do a pap smear regularly, because it can be seen and detected if abnormal cervical cell activity occurs. So, cervical cancer can be prevented.

In addition, you can also vaccinate HPV so you don’t contract cervical cancer later on. HPV is one of the causes of early cervical cancer. This virus spreads through sexual intercourse. If you experience sexually transmitted diseases, the risk of developing this virus is also quite high. For that, you also should always maintain vaginal hygiene to avoid various infections.
Stage of cervical cancer stage
Stage of cervical cancer is grouped based on the level of the main tumor, the spread of cancer to nearby lymph nodes, and the spread of cancer to other parts of the body that are far from where the initial cancer develops. Based on this, the spread of cancer cells is grouped into four stages. Reporting from the American Cancer Society, the following is the stage of cervical cancer stage:

Stage 0
At this stage, the cells in the symptoms of early stage cervical cancer, only in the cells on the outer surface of the cervix. These cancer cells have not attacked deeper cervical tissue.

Stage I
Stage 1 cervical cancer is a stage of cancer where cancer cells are only in the cervical organs. In the world of medicine, stage 1 cervical cancer will be divided into stages 1A (1A1 and 1A2) and 1B (1B1 and 1B2).

At this stage, cancer cells have attacked the cervix but do not grow outside the uterus. Cancer cells have not spread to nearby lymph nodes or spread to more distant parts of the body. Also note that stage 1 cervical cancer is divided into several groups, namely:

At this stage, the bad cells causing cervical cancer the initial symptoms have spread, but do not grow outside the uterus. Cancer cells have not spread to lymph nodes that are nearby or spread to farther places. The stages of symptoms of early stage cervical cancer are divided into several groups, namely:

Stage IA: This is a form of early cervical cancer. Small amounts of cancer cells have invaded the cervix and this can only be seen under a microscope. Stage 1A is further divided into:

  • Stage IA1: Cancer cells have attacked the cervical tissue with a depth of <3 mm and have a width of <7 mm
  • Stage IA2: Cancer cells already exist in cervical tissue with a depth between 3-5 mm and width <7 mm

Stage IB: Cancer cells can be seen without the aid of a microscope. The size of cancer cells is greater than that of stage 1A, but still spreads only in cervical tissue. Stage 1B is divided into:

  • Stage IB1: Cancer can be seen and has a size of ≤4 cm
  • Stadium IB2: The cancer cell size is greater than 4 cm

Stage II
At this stage, the cancer has spread beyond the cervix and uterus, but has not spread to the pelvic wall or the lower part of the vagina. Cancer cells also have not spread to the closest lymph nodes or to other distant body parts.

Stage IIA: At this stage, the cancer has not spread to the tissue near the cervix, but the cancer may have spread to the upper part of the vagina (not the whole vagina). This stage is further divided into:

Stage IIA1: Cancer can be seen but still not greater than 4 cm
Stage IIA2: Cancer is greater than 4 cm
Stage IIB: Cervical cancer cells initial symptoms have spread to the tissue around the cervix.
Stage III
The cancer has spread to the lower part of the vagina or pelvic wall and may block the urethra. However, cancer cells have not spread to the nearest lymph nodes or to other parts of the body that are farther away. This stadium is divided into:

Stage IIIA: The cancer has spread to the lower third of the vagina but does not reach the pelvic wall.

Stage IIIB: There are two possible conditions in this stage IIIB, namely:

The cancer has grown to reach the pelvic wall and / or has blocked one or both of the urethra. This can then cause kidney problems.
The cancer has spread to lymph nodes around the pelvis but not to distant parts of the body. Tumors in stage IIIB can be of various sizes and may have spread to the lower part of the vagina or pelvic wall.

Stage IV
This is the final stage of cervical cancer. Cancer not only attacks the cervix, but also to the closest part of the cervix or to other body parts that are even far from the cervix. This stadium is divided into:

Stage IVA: Cancer cells have spread to the bladder or to the rectum, both of which are the closest organs to the cervix. However, at this stage the cancer cells have not spread to the lymph glands

Stage IVB: Cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body that are far from the cervix, such as to the lungs or liver.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *